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As Memorial Day passes, it is timely to reflect that no part of the health care system is under more demographic pressure than care for the elderly. This includes many of the 9.1 million veterans, for whose service we all give thanks and respect, receiving acute care and nursing home care under the Veterans Health Administration.

Overall, the generation of baby boomers now retired or retiring are surviving long into their golden years. The numbers grow year after year, and the trend is projected to continue for many years. This is a double-edged sword because the soon-to-be retirees include over half of the senior leaders and practitioners currently in the health care system.

Innovations in elder care are a key part of the strategy to improve the quality of care and capacity of resources already stretched to the limit. Interim senior managers are often brought into long-term care facilities to introduce and implement such programs of innovation.

Innovation focuses on healthy active lifestyle

Service managers report some of their most rewarding experiences come from helping older members of society find safety and companionship in an atmosphere of care delivery driven by best practices.

Sometimes a temporary assignment takes a clinical leader back to an assisted living setting where they have served in the past. This lets them see the longer term effects of the contributions they have made. It also gives them a chance to reconnect with the many staff members they have influenced over the years.

NHS Solutions has long-standing relationships with some of America’s most successful change managers. These leaders take great pride in moving from challenge to challenge with the tools to make a positive difference wherever their next role might take them.

The need for efficient and effective care programs calls for leaders who can reach far and wide with their expertise, and extend the benefits of best practice management. And we all, old and young alike, benefit from that commitment to better elder care.